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Alice Stone Blackwell

ARMENIAN POEMS


Contents | Table of contents [as in the book] | Preface | Introduction

Bedros Tourian | Michael Nalbandian | Abp. Khorène Nar Bey De Lusignan
Mugurditch Beshiktashlian | Raphael Patkanian | Leo Alishan | St. Gregory of Narek
Nerses the Graceful | Saïat Nova | Djivan | Raffi | Koutcharian | Terzyan | Totochian
Damadian | Atom Yarjanian (Siamanto) | Daniel Varoujan | Archag Tchobanian
Hovhannes Toumanian | Hovhannes Hovhannessian | Zabel Assatour (Madame Sybil)
Mugurditch Chrimian Hairig | M. Portoukalian | Mihran Damadian
Arshag D. Mahdesian | Nahabed Koutchak | Shoushanig Khourghinian
Avedik Issahakian | Avedis Aharonian | Karekin Servantzdiantz | Bedros Adamian
Tigrane Yergate | Khorène M. Antreassian | Djivan | Miscellaneous songs and poems

APPENDIX: The Armenian Women | The Armenian Church
Bibliography | Comments on the first edition of "Armenian Poems"


COMMENT ON THE FIRST EDITION

The work is admirably done.—Boston Post.

A valuable addition to our poet lore.—Philadelphia Press.

Miss Blackwell seems to have brought to her work rare intelligence and excellent taste.—Boston Journal.

We are grateful for this introduction to authors some of whom have evidently high poetic powers.—San Francisco Chronicle.

Contains many choice bits of verse, and is ample evidence that the spirit of poetry is the same the world over, whether in sunny Italy, pastoral England or persecuted Armenia.—New York Journal.

Miss Blackwell has succeeded in carrying over much of the native fire into her translations. . . . These verses give us a very high opinion of the literary capacity of the race which produced them.—Congregationalist.

Miss Blackwell has caught, we believe, the Armenian literary spirit. Whatever these poems may have been in the original, they are certainly gems in the English dress in which she has clothed them.—Boston Advertiser.

That a second edition of the Armenian Poems is already in press, although the first has not yet been out a fortnight, shows how strong is the interest in this graceful and forceful interpretation of the life of an oppressed people.—Boston Transcript.

The translator has been remarkably successful in giving in English forms an extremely interesting series of noteworthy poems from the literary stores of a long-suffering people.— Buffalo Commercial.

A most interesting product of Armenian poetical genius. It is a real service to let Americans and Englishmen realize that the nation for which we plead is a cultivated one, with not only a history, but a still living and productive literary power.—Rt. Hon. James Bryce.

The poems cover a wide range of subjects, and extend through all the passions that go to make up man’s life—love, hate, liberty, religion, home, etc. Miss Blackwell’s work has been well done, and she has brought to it rare intelligence, taste and poetic ability.—Boston Times.

A collection of poems revealing unexpected beauties. The lines are full of rich similes, and are pleasantly melodious, and altogether the translator’s venture into an almost unknown literature has been most successful.—Chicago Post.

The great sympathy everywhere aroused for the Armenians will heighten the interest in their poetic literature, and their poetry is, of itself, worth attention. Almost every note is touched; of patriotism, love, religion. The volume offers a poetic study of very curious interest.—Lillian Whiting in Chicago Inter-Ocean.

A volume of Armenian poems is now issued, and it gives a new idea of the romantic nature of the Christian victims of Turkish rapacity and bigotry. The poems show an unusual love of nature, and are full of tender and delicate sentiments. These people are not, as increasing evidence shows, a half-savage, ignorant, immoral race, but a fine-tempered and intelligent body of men and women.—N. Y. Commercial Advertiser.

“Beautiful!” is the exclamation of a pleased reader, laying aside this collection of poems. They breathe a gentle fragrance. The soul is broader because of their perusal. They speak with a strange fascination. New inspiration is gathered from these simple yet wonderfully profound gems of poetic literature. . . . The work has been well done, and we are delighted to place this treasure in our library.—Baltimore Methodist.

These poems are truly Oriental in the fire of their passion and the splendor of their imagery. . . . We can better understand the song of Solomon after reading these. A tinge of sadness colors many of these exquisite poems, for they have been written in a land desolated by fire and sword. But, beyond all else, they breathe a spirit of the purest and most exalted patriotism, and are all aglow with love of truth and liberty.—Christian Work.

The poems expressing the hopes, fears, sorrows, aspirations and ideals of this people have a double interest, that of literature and that of life. ... The melancholy earnestness and true poetic feeling found in such verse will commend it to a wide and sympathetic circle of readers, who may learn from this literary source, as from nowhere else, something of the deeper-lying traits and tendencies of the Armenian folk. And the qualities that come out in the poems are such as to quicken one’s admiration and increase one’s sympathy.—Hartford Courant.

The poems are interesting as revealing, to a hitherto unequaled extent, the poetic genius and character of this betrayed and suffering people. It will doubtless surprise many to find that Armenia has both a classic literature and a rich fund of nineteenth-century poetry; that her poets have written with a vigor of thought, a delicacy of imagination, and a direct simplicity of expression, such as characterizes the best poetry of any country; that the verses are interesting in themselves, for the same reasons that the Bosnian and Servian poetry is interesting.—Christian Register.

These poems reveal as by a searchlight the deepest qualities of the Armenian character. They show forth an ingrained heroism and an ardent aspiration worthy of the martyr people of this so-called Christian century. No generous man or woman can read them without instinctively desiring to send help to a people capable of thoughts so lofty and sentiment so tender.—Frances E. Wittard.

I think your translation of the poems admirable.—Dr. Cyrus Hamlin.

I have read with much pleasure your translations of the Armenian poems, especially my brother’s.—Prince Guyde Lusignan.

General A. W. Greely wrote from Washington, D. C.: “I spoke on this subject (the Armenian question) before the Parish Union of All Souls’ Church. The literary part of the address consisted in reading your admirable translations of the beautiful songs, ‘Nightingale,’ ‘Cradle Song,’ ‘Mother Araxes,’ etc., which were very much praised. An Armenian was most persistent in seeking for copies of these songs, which brought his country back vividly to his mind and heart.”

Miss Alice Fletcher wrote concerning the meeting of a Literary Society in Washington, D. C.: “I read on that occasion several of your beautiful translations of Armenian poems, and was delighted with the interest and enthusiasm they evoked. The meeting was at the residence of Dr. William T. Harris, Commissioner of Education. There were many learned and famous folk there, as the Literary Society has in its membership some of our brightest men and women. Armenian poetry was a new realm to almost all, and stirred an interest in the (Armenian) people in a new manner, along new lines.”

 

Contents | Table of contents [as in the book] | Preface | Introduction

Bedros Tourian | Michael Nalbandian | Abp. Khorène Nar Bey De Lusignan
Mugurditch Beshiktashlian | Raphael Patkanian | Leo Alishan | St. Gregory of Narek
Nerses the Graceful | Saïat Nova | Djivan | Raffi | Koutcharian | Terzyan | Totochian
Damadian | Atom Yarjanian (Siamanto) | Daniel Varoujan | Archag Tchobanian
Hovhannes Toumanian | Hovhannes Hovhannessian | Zabel Assatour (Madame Sybil)
Mugurditch Chrimian Hairig | M. Portoukalian | Mihran Damadian
Arshag D. Mahdesian | Nahabed Koutchak | Shoushanig Khourghinian
Avedik Issahakian | Avedis Aharonian | Karekin Servantzdiantz | Bedros Adamian
Tigrane Yergate | Khorène M. Antreassian | Djivan | Miscellaneous songs and poems

APPENDIX: The Armenian Women | The Armenian Church
Bibliography | Comments on the first edition of "Armenian Poems"

 

See also:

November 23, 2002
At last... Something is started moving on.

Acknowledgements:

Source: "tabadam" publishing house
Provided by: Poghos Poghosyan
Scanned by: Poghos Poghosyan
OCR: Poghos Poghosyan
Corrections: Poghos Poghosyan

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